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ICYMI: Rubio Joins Kudlow

U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) joined Kudlow to discuss terrorists crossing the southern border, the conservative case for industrial policy, and more. Watch the full interview on YouTube and Rumble. On the senator’s recent op-ed about terrorists crossing the...

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Next Week: Rubio Staff Hosts Mobile Office Hours

U.S. Senator Marco Rubio’s (R-FL) office will host in-person Mobile Office Hour next week to assist constituents with federal casework issues in their respective local communities. These office hours offer constituents who do not live close to one of Senator Rubio’s...

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Democrats Reject Rubio Amendment to Protect Faith-Based Organizations

Nov 29, 2022 | Press Releases

Religious organizations, including orphanages, women’s shelters, and schools, would likely be subject to crippling lawsuits if the so-called Respect for Marriage Act (RFMA) becomes law.
 
At issue is the creation of a private right action for “any person who is harmed” by any entity operating “under color of state law” that does not recognize a marriage recognized by the state in which it took place. The intentionally vague phrasing makes the provision ripe for abuse. To protect faith-based organizations, U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) filed an amendment to strike the private right of action. Led by Democrats, the Senate rejected that amendment.
 

  • “This bill does not protect religious liberty. Nuns running orphanages will find themselves in court if it becomes law. That’s outrageous. No faith-based organization will be immune from the insanity. Christian. Jewish. Muslim. Everyone. 

 

  • “The Senate had a chance to fix this obvious problem, but it failed. Now faith-based organizations will suffer the consequences.” — Senator Rubio

 
Although the bill would protect nonprofits whose “principal purpose” is the “study, practice, or advancement of religion,” it would not protect other faith-based organizations. As a result, an orphanage run by nuns who do not want to place children with same-sex couples could be sued in federal court by any individual. The same is true for other faith-based entities acting “under color of state law,” another intentionally vague and ambiguous term.