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Miami, FL — U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) joined Maria Bartiromo on Sunday Morning Futures to discuss the violence at the U.S. Capitol, Big Tech’s power, the consequences of Democrats’ calls to impeach the President, and China’s reaction to the events at the U.S. Capitol. See below for highlights and watch the full interview here.

On the violence at the U.S. Capitol:

“It’s disgusting. It’s unpatriotic. It runs counter to everything we stand for. I can't give you an assessment of every single person that went in there, but it's clear now by arrests that have been made that QAnon people were involved, this ridiculous conspiracy. Then you've got white supremacists in there, you’ve got members of the ‘Proud Boys.’ It’s a rogues gallery of groups who thought that they were going to storm the Capitol, apprehend the Vice President and Members of Congress, and have them ‘pay the ultimate price’ as they called it. ‘String ‘em up,’ they would say. 

“I’ve had protests here in Florida calling for me to be strung up and others. So it’s completely unacceptable. Ninety percent of the country or more would agree with what I just said. The overwhelming majority of people who voted for Donald Trump would agree with everything I just said. And it was a moment where we could sort of say this is enough guys. Our country can’t keep doing these kinds of things and unify the country.”

On recent actions by the left and Big Tech:

“The left has decided this is an opportunity to destroy the right. So if you ever voted for Donald Trump, if you ever supported anything he did, you are just as guilty as the people who went into that Capitol. This is also an opportunity for them to now go out and put pressure on social media companies to literally not just erase the President, but erase everybody. We are now living in a country where four or five companies — unelected, unaccountable — have the power, a monopoly power to decide we are going to wipe people out — we’re just going to erase them from any sort of digital platform, whether it’s selling things and the like.

“Even if you don’t like Donald Trump, that should be very concerning that they have that power. It's also very cynical by the way, okay. Facebook, Twitter, these are not moral champions here. The reason why these guys are doing it is because Democrats are about to take power and they view this as a way to get on their good side to avoid any restrictions or any sort of laws being passed that hurt them.”

On the conservative movement:

“No person in the United States of America, or the world for that matter, should be willing to do what we just saw happen on Wednesday… I will say the President does bear some responsibility here… We have for too long indulged some of these groups as part of the conservative movement. These are not conservatives. These are wackos. These are nutjobs.

“Now, 99 percent of the people that were at the protest did not storm the Capitol. They have strong feelings about the election, they support the President, and they were not a part of it. But there is this element, very small, but enough people to create a tremendous amount of damage and put a lot of people in danger. And we should be rejecting that group, not after the fact, but before… This is why we have to watch what we say and who we allow into the movement because these are the people that can do terrible things.”

On the consequences of Democrats’ calls to impeach the President:

“It’s unfortunate that instead of unifying us right now, Biden and the Democrats have chosen to use this as an opportunity to talk about ridiculous things like ‘let’s impeach a president’ who isn't even going to be in office in about nine days. ...

“Joe Biden ran as a guy who is going to unify the country, and he’s going to spend the first couple weeks of his presidency — not confirming his nominees, not dealing with the pandemic — but the first couple weeks of his presidency is going to be about removing a president that is already not in office. 

“That’s what we’re talking about here: stoke up more division in this country, stoke up more fights, create more grievances. Instead of saying everybody agrees that we’ve hit rock bottom … If that did not cause us all as a country to wake up and say, ‘We need to take a deep breath here, look what we’re turning into,’ I don’t know what will.”

On China’s response to the violence at the U.S. Capitol:

“As far as China is concerned, their fundamental argument is democracy doesn't work, it's messy, it’s chaotic, it creates all kinds of problems. Can you think of a better talking point for them, can you think of a better support for that argument, than what we saw on Wednesday?

“They will play those images over and over again to their own people, to people in Hong Kong, everywhere, and they will say, ‘You want democracy? That's what democracy looks like. What you need is order and stability, which you can only get through one-party totalitarianism.’ We’re helping them, simple as that, and they’re laughing at us. They’re basically saying, ‘America is in decline, they’re a mess, China is going to be the future.’ So we did tremendous damage to ourselves.”

On Jack Ma’s disappearance from the public:

“What happened to [Ma] is his company has too much power and the Chinese Communist Party is not going to allow any company in China or anywhere to have power that in any way rivals theirs. And so they’re going to eliminate him. I mean that’s what totalitarian regimes do.”