Fighting for Florida

Rubio’s efforts to fix Florida’s water quality issues in 2017-2018:

  • Following Rubio’s July 8th request to President Trump, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers delayed scheduled discharges from Lake Okeechobee to the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie Rivers.

  • In June, Rubio applauded the U.S. Army Corps for including key Florida infrastructure and water projects in the FY18 Work Plan. Rubio helped craft the omnibus bill that made these funds available to the Army Corps. The Senate also passed two Rubio measures to protect Lake Okeechobee communities and restore the Everglades.

  • In May, Rubio successfully secured FY19 funding priorities in the Senate Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act.

  • In March, Rubio urged the Army Corps to allocate funding for vital Florida water infrastructure projects, including the Herbert Hoover Dike rehabilitation and Everglades restoration.

  • In the 2018 spending bill, Rubio supported the budget request of $82 million for Herbert Hoover Dike construction and included an additional $180 million in the additional funding pot for Flood Control in the Construction account.

  • In February, Rubio was able to secure funding for Army Corps flood control projects in Florida through the disaster supplemental. Rubio also urged the Army Corps to use those funds to expedite completion of the Herbert Hoover Dike rehabilitation project.

  • In October, Rubio led nearly all members of the Florida congressional delegation in urging the leaders of the Senate and House appropriations committees to provide robust funding to expedite the completion of the Herbert Hoover Dike.

Appropriations:

FY19 Commerce, Justice, Science and Related Agencies Appropriations

  • Report language and $5 million to accelerate deployment of effective methods of intervention and mitigation to reduce the frequency, severity, and impact of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) in freshwater systems. The report language encourages the agency to expand its collaboration with states to monitor, predict, track, and respond to HABs in the marine environment, and $1 million to expand existing support for states to assess domoic acid levels of HAB species in marine environment.

FY19 Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations

  • Restores budget cuts for Everglades restoration, including $83,000 for Everglades restoration under the National Park Services’ Resource Stewardship account, more than $3 million under the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service budget, and more than $6 million under the U.S. Geological Survey budget.
  • Report language to support more external research into the control and prevention of harmful algal blooms.
  • $2 million for land acquisition for Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge.
  • Report language encouraging the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to expedite completion of biological opinions for the Central Everglades Planning Project (CEPP), including suggested deadlines of no later than Sept. 13, 2018 for the New Water Phase and no later than Feb. 2, 2019 for the South Phase. 
  • $3.204 million (nearly double FY18 levels) for the South Florida Geographic Program with dedicated funding of at least—
    • $500,000 to enhance water quality and seagrass monitoring in the Caloosahatchee Estuary and Indian River Lagoon especially with respect to assessing the impact of Lake Okeechobee discharges; and
    • $500,000 to enhance water quality and seagrass monitoring in Florida Bay and Biscayne Bay especially with respect to assessing the impact of Everglades Restoration projects.
    • $1.694 billion for the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (SRF).
    • $63 million for the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA).
    • $26.723 million for the National Estuary Program (NEP), including support for NEPs at Charlotte Harbor and Indian River Lagoon.
    • $15 million for the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Rural Water Technical Assistance (a $2.3 million increase), including $1.7 million for technical assistance grants.
    • $713.823 million for EPA’s Science and Technology programs, including report language directing the agency to increase emphasis on external grant funding for research to control and prevent Harmful Algal Blooms.

Background regarding Rubio’s work on water-related issues affecting South Florida from previous Congresses:

  • September 15, 2016 – Landmark Everglades restoration and water quality improvement projects bundled together as the Central Everglades Planning Project (CEPP) passed the Senate as part of the Water Resources and Development Act (WRDA) by a vote of 95-3 with Rubio voting in favor.    

  • September 12, 2016 - Rubio welcomed the Senate’s continued advancement of the CEPP, as well as three more Florida provisions included in the WRDA.

  • September 9, 2016 - Senator Jim Inhofe, Chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, penned an op-ed in the Miami Herald detailing how Rubio persuaded him to support CEPP. 

  • August 26, 2016 - Rubio participated in a Tri-Cities Community Meeting with local leaders in Pahokee. Rubio discussed repairs of the Herbert Hoover Dike, Lake Okeechobee, and the status of congressional action that would impact South Florida’s Everglades communities. 

  •  August 18, 2016 - Rubio and 15 Republican Members of the U.S. House of Representatives from Florida urged President Obama to reconsider his Administration’s denial of Governor Rick Scott’s request for a federal disaster declaration in response to the toxic algal blooms in the state’s waterways.

  • May 12, 2016 -  Rubio supported the Fiscal Year 2017 Energy and Water Development Appropriations bill that included $49.5 million for Herbert Hoover Dike seepage control.

  • April 29, 2016 - Rubio met with the SFWMD in West Palm Beach.

  • February 16, 2016 - Senator Rubio reiterated the need for CEPP to help alleviate discharges from Lake Okeechobee in an op-ed in the TC Palm.

  • February 8, 2016 - Senator Rubio signed a delegation letter to the Chairmen and Ranking Members of the committees of jurisdiction (Senate EPW, House Transportation) requesting CEPP authorization be included in the forthcoming water resources bill

  • December 18, 2015 - Senator Rubio’s Ten Mile Creek deauthorization language became Public Law No. 114-113 as part of the end of the year spending bill.

  • May 14, 2015 - Senator Rubio wrote a letter to Chairman Lamar Alexander and Ranking Member Dianne Feinstein requesting that language to deauthorize the Ten Mile Creek Water Preserve be included in the fiscal year 2016 Energy and Water Development Appropriations bill.

  • February 20, 2015 - Senator Rubio took an aerial tour of the Northern Everglades to view the SFWMD/USACE projects.

  • January 21, 2015 - Senator Rubio held a second stakeholder conference call where he discussed CEPP, Ten Mile Creek, and Lake Okeechobee releases.

  • January 8, 2015 - S. 120 is introduced with Senator Rubio as an original cosponsor to authorize CEPP.

  • January 8, 2015 - Senator Rubio introduced S. 124, a bill to deauthorize the Ten Mile Creek Water Preserve Area Critical Restoration Project so the mismanaged federal project, that sat dormant for over a decade, could be transferred away from the federal government and into the hands of the State through the SFWMD.

  • September 18, 2014 - Senator Rubio cosponsored S. 2861 to authorize CEPP.

  • July 30, 2014 - Senator Rubio convened a stakeholder conference call to discuss the urgent need for CEPP and draft legislation that would move operational authority of Lake Okeechobee to the state.

  • June 20, 2014 - Senator Rubio visited the Indian River Lagoon to see the effects of the discharges firsthand, and held a roundtable discussion with key stakeholders to hear community concerns.

  • May 22, 2014 - Senator Rubio voted in support of the final conference report on WRRDA, but expressed concern regarding the absence of authorization for CEPP. On the same day, he also sent a letter to the Army Corps requesting that CEPP be approved as quickly as possible.

  • April 18, 2014 - Senator Rubio signed a delegation letter to WRRDA conferees requesting that CEPP be included in the final conference report.

  • May 15, 2013 - Senator Rubio cited the absence of CEPP as a factor in his vote against the Senate version of the Water Resources Reform and Development Act (WRRDA).

Now that we are in hurricane season, my Senate office stands ready to serve you and your family in the event of a storm. It is never too early for you and your family to prepare for a potential tropical storm or hurricane.

Here are a few tips to help prepare for the 2018 hurricane season, which officially begins June 1 and ends November 30:

  • Know your area and the evacuation routes. Evacuation route information is available on the Florida Division of Emergency Management’s website.
  • Have a plan to prepare your home and/or business with storm shutters or plywood. Bring items that could be picked up by the wind and break windows - like lawn furniture, toys, or trash cans - inside.
  • Make sure you know where your home’s safe room is located. Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) website details what a safe room should look like.
  • Keep your automobile fully fueled; if electric power is cut off, gas stations may not be able to operate pumps for several days.
  • Be prepared to survive on your own for a few days. Assemble a disaster kit with a battery-powered radio, flashlights, extra batteries, a first-aid kit, blankets, clothing, food, water, and prescription medications and needed medical supplies. The Florida Division of Emergency Management provides a good list of items to have ready.
  • Know how to shut off utilities. Know how your water heating and air-conditioning systems work and where pilot lights are located if you have natural gas appliances. If you have any questions, contact your local utility company.
  • Gather your personal documents - insurance policy information, emergency contact information, and any other vital documents – and have them somewhere they can be easily located and ready to take with you should you have to evacuate your home.

Remember, if you need help or have questions, please contact any of my offices and we will do our best to help.

Some other useful resources:

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Senator Marco Rubio today delivered remarks at Focus on the Family’s 2018 “Faith and Freedom Tour” on the importance of strong American families. A rough transcript of Rubio’s remarks is below:
 
It’s really an honor to be here with you guys. The theme and really the core mission of this organization it couldn’t have been more accurate name given the challenges that we face today, “Focus on the Family,” it’s almost pressing in its importance. I think sometimes the smarter we get as a country, as a society, as humanity, the dumber we realize we are. I think we’re back to that moment where issue after issue, and I mean issue after issue, we turn on the news almost every day and you ask yourself what’s happening domestically?
 
There’s a challenge in the country, whatever It might be. A horrible tragedy, where just in the last three months, a couple of young men go into schools and take the lives of 27 human beings in two different incidents. The runaway violence in different parts of the country, just issue after issue. You realize that it goes back to when you get back to the core every single one of them has a common theme, at some point, a breakdown in the family unit. Now we are learning more of what happened in Texas. But, we most certainly know that this killer in Parkland is an individual who had very significant home problems specially after the death of the mother and not to excuse it but just to tell you why focusing on the family is so critical.
 
The bottom line is families are the building blocks of our country, of a society. At its most basic level, and if you look at the most basic level of society it begins in the family. If the family is broken nothing else in society works well. It’s as I’ve said before, many times, it’s the fundamental unit of a society and not only that, it’s the most important institution in terms of passing down values of what’s right and what’s wrong. Laws can tell you what’s legal, laws cannot tell right and wrong. It is the institution that teaches you that there are absolute rights and absolute wrongs. There are things that are absolutely wrong and there are things that are absolutely right. There’s no law, no book, well there is one book that can teach you that. But there’s no degree, that sort of inculcating of values is what allows everything this country is about to flourish. Free enterprise works because while we have the opportunity to make money and prosperity we have for generations in this country deeply infused by Judeo-Christian values believed that we have an obligation to take care of one another and that did not necessarily mean government programs. It meant stepping forward in organizations in our community and to this day, despite all bad news, there’s a reason why any time any disaster faces our country or any tragedy you see Americans respond. I witnessed that twice just in the last year after Hurricanes impacted my state, where our state was flooded and people from all over the country who stepped forward to volunteer time and money.
 
I’m particularly grateful to the Southern Baptist Mission in North Carolina that were begging to be able to help and came down, they provided invaluable service. Nobody made them do it, there was no tax incentive to do it. Nobody paid them to do it, something compelled them to do it and that is the value and the believe that they had an obligation to care for their fellow men and women. To care for their fellow citizens. But by the way, they’ve also deployed in other countries. Which tells us that their faith infused them with the believe they have an obligation to care for all mankind, including those who may not share our national borders. That’s why the family is so vital to passing down those values from generation to generation. By the way strong families are also incubators of economic opportunity, financial security, and they generate what’s called the social capital upon which an economy such as ours can function and on which our constitutional republic by the way also depends. There is no replacement for the family, there’s nothing, no agency no government program that we can create that can replace the family.
 
We have great innovations in the 21st century, but for example, Facebook it might be able to help you find out what your high school and college friends are doing now, but there’s no way Facebook can raise children. It can’t help you with a place to stay while you’re in between jobs. Facebook can’t instill the values needed for a productive life or teach the difference between right and wrong. So I will tell you, that in many ways, the state of our union can be determined by the state of our “unions.” I don’t mean labor unions. I’m talking about the union of a strong nation with strong families. So it should be very concerning to everybody, all Americans that, even in the time of a growing economy, American family life is crumbling. Family formation is the last rite of passage into adulthood for our children and it’s increasingly suffering from a failure to launch. In the 1950s, fewer than 5 percent of children were born out of marriage.
 
Today, that number is over 40 percent, meaning almost half of the children in this country are born into a single parent home and in many cases into a family where the father is non-existent in the child’s life. Financially does not provide, emotionally does not provide and obviously is not part of the family unit in terms of teaching values. There’s a recent study by the Institute for Family Studies found that the number of married Americans ages 18 to 64 has hit an all-time low, with only 48 percent of all adults now are married, compared to 75 percent in 1960 and nearly 60 percent just less than 20 years ago in 2000. The failure to form families is most clear among younger Americans. Last year, only 26 percent of adults ages 18 to 34 were married, that’s down from 40 percent in 1990.
 
Just this week, the Centers for Disease Control announced that U.S. birthrates hit a 40-year low in 2017. And as the economy began accelerate even faster toward the end of last year; the provisional data suggests fertility began to fall even faster, confounding the historical relationship between the health of our economy and formation of new families and family members. At the same time, America is wracked by total dysfunction for what it means to have honorable, respectable men and women in the home, at the workplace, and in our churches and synagogues, in religion, by the way that’s if they even have faith as part of their life at all. There is no coincidence. Our deeper cultural and societal problems are the fruit of what has gone deeply wrong in American family life.
 
Gone are the days when our young men and women could expect good, stable jobs, a spouse, and children to provide the hallmarks of a productive life – no matter how good the statistics tell us our economy is. That is, I think, the crucial question for the social contract of the 21st century: can we re-invigorate an America where a working class family can afford a mortgage and three kids, like my parents and your parents were able to do? By the way, this is not the same question as whether “can we get 4 percent GDP growth in our economy?” or “how can we make everyone more upwardly mobile?” These are important questions to be asked, but they are not the questions that will determine the strength of America’s family values in the century to come. The question should matter greatly for those of us who consider ourselves to be conservatives. Where the family tree branches thin out, the appeal for bigger and bigger government grows stronger to step in.
 
Some of you might remember, in the 2012 election there was a commercial an ad by the Obama campaign, it was called the “Life of Julia” and this ad depicted a young woman whose every choice was either provided for or subsidized by the government from cradle to grave, with no family, or children, or broader community ever seen or even referenced. Without the personal and financial support of strong, close families, people are left to depend on the state on the government to fund and provide for those needs. We know that government has an important role to play, but government will never ever be able to fulfill our needs. Like our fundamental rights in this country, our families are given to us by our creator, by God. And so what really happens when we rely mostly on government to solve our problems, rather than empowering families, is a deep and pervasive sense of loneliness, which I think is a major driver of the toxic partisanship, division and polarization which characterizes our politics today.
 
Loneliness can drive someone to seek out community because we are all programed to seek community, by our Creator. When you’re lonely sometimes you seek out community in national politics, and you come to define yourself by who you voted for, what party you’re a part of, and you end up putting your faith in a human being, a mortal man or woman—flawed, stained with original sin. Putting our faith in politicians that, like government programs, will never be able to fulfill our hopes and dreams – instead of seeking community next door in our neighborhoods, or 30 minutes away at our grandmother’s house. Loneliness can drive some people to seek community based off ethnic pride, which at its extreme can lead to racism and violence. You do that in search of a familial sense of belonging to something that gives your purpose  greater than yourself. Loneliness can drive us away from sharing our faith and country with our families, neighbors, and fellow countrymen, and into the anonymity where sin often flourishes.
I don’t mean to over exaggerate or sound catastrophic, but this is the state of the American family. If this is our reality, then we should stop at nothing to address it. And it’s with that in mind that as you go about your work, your activism, your engagement to fix broken families at the personal level, and to fix the conditions that create them at the national level that I wanted to be here to talk to you about it. It’s with that in mind that we must vigorously defend those institutions in society that empower the family to teach values and that’s why I strongly support religious liberty and our defense of it.
 
I was reading just this morning the story about Philadelphia. Catholic Social Services, which for years has run over 100 foster homes, recently was denied and stopped receiving new foster children from the City of Philadelphia because they won’t certify same-sex or unmarried couples as foster parents. They would prefer people in that situation to another agency but they themselves won’t recognize it, so they now, after all these years, will no longer be able to assist the children under their foster program. And I think that’s such a clear, recent example of how religious liberty and family values go hand-in-hand. Here, you have a government that would rather enforce a progressive, cultural value, and force it on a religious organization than give foster children a healthy home to grow up in. Many of our leaders wonder why American family life becomes increasingly dysfunctional, but the reasons are right there in front of us.
 
By the way, it’s with that in mind that I stood up for families in the United States Senate. We had our tax debate recently and there were many people, including some of the largest newspapers in America—the WSJ and others—who were very upset when we demanded we expand the Child Tax Credit as part of tax reform. Child Tax Credit, by the way, you can only get if you are working. You have to be working to be able to qualify for it.
 
How is it possible that the Republican Party can find hundreds of billions of dollars to give to multinational corporations, many of which care little about our country, but we fear cutting the taxes of hard-working families that are trying to make ends meet and provide for their children? If you work hard, pay your taxes, and start a family, you are doing immense good for our country in a time when we need stable families more than ever.
 
I believe that the preamble to the Constitution declares our purpose to “secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity” for a reason. So we have to put our money where our mouth is. We should defund Planned Parenthood – taking important steps wherever possible like the Administration’s recently-announced restrictions on Title X funding for abortion clinics – protect religious liberty from the opponents of faith, and allow the American people the freedom of conscience to believe and do what’s right.
 
But we should also expand the Child Tax Credit, bring back high-paying working-class jobs, and enact a conservative, fiscally-responsible parental leave policy that allows parents the option of using Social Security benefits early, when they have a child and cannot afford to take time away from work unpaid.  I truly and deeply believe this is the agenda of the future, because it applies our timeless principles and to the gifts God has given us, and it applies to the challenges of our time.
 
Ultimately, we cannot have a strong country without strong people. We will not have strong people without strong families, and I am thankful that you are a partner in this fight of rebuilding America and strengthening it, not from the top down, but from the ground up. Parents, children, and families. Churches, synagogues and faith communities. That is truly how we restore America’s greatness. Thank you.
 

A PDF of the letter is available here.

April 25, 2018
The Honorable Marco Rubio
United States Senate
284 Russell Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510

Dear Senator Rubio,

I am writing to you in my capacity of incoming President of the Safety Net Hospital
Alliance of Florida (aka the Safety Net Alliance). Our members include Florida’s largest and most prominent public, teaching, children’s and regional perinatal care hospital systems.Despite representing just 10 percent of Florida’s hospitals, each year we provide one-fourth of Florida’s hospital care to senior citizens who are Medicare beneficiaries equaling over $4.6 billion netMedicare dollars. Our association would like to offer our enthusiastic support for S. 2690, Reforming Medicare Appeals Process Burdening Florida’s Hospitals. We believe it will bring much-needed checks and balances to Medicare’s Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) finance and accounting administration.

Your good bill makes several important changes to the Medicare statute that will improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the DSH program. Perhaps most importantly, it removes the current handcuffs on hospitals’ right to due process in administrative and legal challenges to Medicare’s DSH payment data and decisions. Allowing hospitals to effectively state their case in these proceedings will lead to more bureaucratic errors being identified and corrected. This will in turn bring increased transparency and efficiency to a program that, while essential to the health of our communities, is too often administered in an obscure and capricious manner.

Why do we care?  This bill will ensure that we are able to continue to care for Florida’s Medicare beneficiaries.If you recall, Tampa General Hospital nearly lost two million dollars in Medicare DSH payments last year after a Medicare claims administrator failed to properly account for uncompensated-care claims data. While, thanks to your assistance, Tampa General was ultimately paid what Medicare owed them under the law, an intelligently run program should have no need for such interventions. We hope that S. 2690 will bring some of that intelligence to Medicare’s DSH program.

The Safety Net Alliance is a Florida not-for-profit corporation whose fourteen members include Florida’s largest and most prominent public, teaching, children’s and regional perinatal care hospital systems. Despite representing just 10 percent of Florida’s hospitals, our members collectively manage one-third of all Florida hospital patient days while absorbing 40 percent of the state’s hospital charity care costs and 30 percent of all Medicaid days. Our small group of hospitals are recognized for their unique shared mission to train tomorrow’s physicians and provide accessible high-quality specialty care to all Floridians, regardless of their ability to pay.

In closing, I would like to extend not only my gratitude to you as a champion for Florida’s most vulnerable and the hospitals that serve them, but offer my assistance as well. Please let me know if there is anything the Safety Net Alliance or I can do to support your efforts to shepherd this important bill through the process.  

Lindy Kennedy
Executive Vice President 

 Preliminary numbers courtesy of Senate Appropriations Committee.

Member

Subcomm.

Agency

Provision/Funding

Rubio

AG

ARS

Maintains language for facility lease agreements

Rubio

AG

ARS

Retains report language on Citrus Greening Disease Research

Rubio

AG

ARS

$32.5 million increase for the Agricultural Research Service

Rubio

AG

ARS

Retains report language on Aquaculture

Rubio

AG

ARS

$1 million increase for the Floriculture and Nursery Research Initiative

Rubio

AG

NIFA

$48 million increase for NIFA programs

Rubio

AG

NIFA

$2.5 million for the Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database (FARAD)

Rubio

AG

NIFA

$1.5 million increase for Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment

Rubio

AG

NIFA

$25 million increase for AFRI

Rubio

AG

NIFA

$2 million increase for the Food Safety Outreach Program

Rubio

AG

NIFA

$35 million for the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE)

Rubio

AG

APHIS

$178.2 million provided for Specialty Crop Pests, including the Citrus Health Response Program

Rubio

AG

APHIS

$2 million increase for Huanglongbing Multi-Agency Coordination

Rubio

AG

APHIS

$981.9 million provided for APHIS, an increase of $35.7 million

Rubio

AG

APHIS

Report language retained for Huanglongbing Emergency Response

Rubio

AG

APHIS

$705,000 provided for Horse Protection

Rubio

AG

FSA

Fully funds Agricultural Credit Insurance Fund loan programs

Rubio

AG

NRCS

$10 million increase for Conservation Technical Assistance

Rubio

AG

RUS

Water & Waste - $1.057 billion for Water and Waste programs, an increase of $539 million above FY2017 enacted levels. This funding will support an additional $4.1 billion in loans and $895 million in grants

Rubio

AG

RUS

Maintains loan level for direct Rural Electrification Loans at $5.5 billion

Rubio

AG

RBS

ATTRA funded at $2.75 million

Rubio

AG

FNS

$10 million increase for the Commodity Supplemental Food Program

Rubio

CJS

NIST ITS

MEP = $140 million, an increase of $10 million over FY2017 enacted

Rubio

CJS

NOAA NMFS

Gulf of Mexico Red Snapper Stock Assessments - Provide up to $10,000,000 under NMFS for red snapper stock assessments in the Gulf of Mexico. 

Rubio

CJS

NOAA NMFS

Report language - econ and social science research - Retained Senate report language

Rubio

CJS

NOAA NMFS

Report language - Gear Study for South Atlantic Region - Retained Senate report language

Rubio

CJS

NOAA NMFS

Report language - MRIP - Retained Senate report language

Rubio

CJS

NOAA NMFS

Report language - South Atlantic Red Snapper - Retained Senate report language

Rubio

CJS

NOAA NMFS

Report language - South Atlantic Red Snapper Hooked Gears - Retained Senate report language

Rubio

CJS

NOAA NOS

Coastal Zone Management Grants - $75,000,000 = $5,000,000 increase over FY2017 enacted amount.

Rubio

CJS

NOAA NOS

Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) - Retained Senate report language

Rubio

CJS

NOAA NOS

National Marine Sanctuaries - $54,500,000 = an increase of $3,500,000 over FY2017 enacted. 

Rubio

CJS

NOAA NWS

Analyze, Forecast and Support - Retained Senate report language

Rubio

CJS

NOAA PAC

CDARS = $21,650,000 = an increase of $21,150,000 over FY2017 enacted. 

Rubio

CJS

NOAA PAC

Hurricane Hunters - Expanded on Senate report language and provided $121,000,000 for NOAA to procure a hurricane hunter backup. 

Rubio

CJS

JJ

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; Missing and Exploited Training and Technical Assistance Program - $76M ($3.5M increase)

Rubio

CJS

OVW

Office on Violence Against Women Grant Programs = $492 million

Rubio

CJS

JJ

National Institute of Justice; Comprehensive School Safety Initative - $75M; report lang included

Rubio

CJS

NASA Exploration

Human Exploration Operations Programs - Full funding for Exploration Ground System at KSC, plus $350 million for new mobile launcher

Rubio

DEF

Air Force

$5.65M above PB for F-15 modifications.

Rubio

DEF

Navy

$7.5M above PB for Ocean Warfighting Environment Applied Research

Rubio

DEF

Navy

$5M for Advanced Submarine System Development

Rubio

DEF

Defense-Wide

Supports PB for Microelectronics Technology Development

Rubio

DEF

Navy

Supports PB for: E-2D, E-2D Advanced Procurement; E-2D Advanced Hawkeye; MQ-4 Advanced Procurement; MQ-8 UAV; P-8A Advanced Procurement; F-18 Advanced Procurement

Rubio

DEF

Navy

$465M for an additional (3) P-8A aircraft

Rubio

DEF

Navy

$739M above PB for an addiitonal (10) F-18s for the Navy.

Rubio

DEF

Air Force

Support of PB for E-8C Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS)

Rubio

EWD

Corps of Engineers

Supported the budget request of $82 million for Herbert Hoover Dike construction and included an additional $180 million in the additional funding pot for Flood Control in the Construction account. In FY17, the Herbert Hoover Dike project received an additional $18.67 million from this additional funding pot.

Rubio

EWD

Corps of Engineers

Included additional $35 million in the Construction account for Environmental Restoration and Compliance. In the FY17 work plan, the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration project received an additional $8.5 million from this additional funding pot. 

Rubio

EWD

Corps of Engineers

Included senate report language in the Investigations account  for Central Everglades Planning Project (CEPP) Expedited Validation Study which urges the Corps to expedite the required validation report for the Central Everglades Planning Project.

Rubio

EWD

Corps of Engineers

Included senate report language in the Investigations account encouraging the Corps to conduct, at full federal expense, a study of the coastal areas in the South Atlantic Division to identify the risks and vulnerabilities of those areas to increased hurricane and storm damage reduction as authorized in section 1204 of the WIIN Act.

Rubio

EWD

Corps of Engineers

Included senate report language in the Construction account  that Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan-Indian River Lagoon-South urging the Corps to expedite preparations for design work on the C-23 and C-24 South Reservoirs that along with C-44 Reservoir.

Rubio

EWD

Corps of Engineers

Included senate report language in the Construction account urging the Corps to provide states with guidance and recommendations to implement cost effective measures and planning for sand management. Also included conference report language encouraging the Corps to include in future budget submissions the study of sediment sources authorized in section 1143 of PL 114-322

Rubio

EWD

Corps of Engineers

Included additional $3 million for the Continuing Authorities Section 103- Shore Protection.

Rubio

EWD

Corps of Engineers

Included two construction new starts for Navigation, and one construction new start for a Coastal Storm Damage Reduction project (the Lido Key Shore Protection project would be eligible to compete under this new start).

Rubio

EWD

Corps of Engineers

Included additional $481 million above the FY17 enacted levels in the O&M account including $24.28 million for Navigation Maintenance; $30 million for Inland Waterways; and $50 million for Small, Remote, or Subsistence Navigation.

Rubio

EWD

Corps of Engineers

Included additional funding to meet the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund spending target established by WRRDA 2014.

Rubio

EWD

Corps of Engineers

Included $40 million in the O&M account for Donor and Energy Transfer Ports.

Rubio

EWD

Corps of Engineers

Included senate report language in the Construction account directing the Corps to make publically available a comprehensive snapshot of all SFER cost-share accounting down to the project level for FY18 by September 30, 2018.

Rubio

EWD

Corps of Engineers

Included $6 million for Coastal Ocean Data System (CODS), $3.5 million above the budget request.

Rubio

EWD

Corps of Engineers

Included $70 million above the budget request in the Construction account for Environmental Infrastructure. In FY17, the Florida Keys Water Quality Improvements received $2M from this additional funding pot.

Rubio

EWD

Corps of Engineers

Supported the budget request of $10 million for the National (Levee) Flood Inventory remaining line item in O&M, $5 million above the FY17 enacted levels.

Rubio

EWD

DOE/ODA

$25 million to address threats to critical infrastructure and industrial control systems

Rubio

EWD

DOE/ARPA-E

$353.314 million for ARPA-E

Rubio

FSGG

SBA

Report language requiring a briefing on the effect of Zika on small businesses

Rubio

FSGG

SBA

Report language for a study on the geographic dispersion of Small Business Investment Companies

Rubio

FSGG

GSA

Funding for Ft. Lauderdale, FL courthouse

Rubio

FSGG

Treasury

Report language on Puerto Rico technical assistance

Rubio

FSGG

ONDCP-DFC

Increased funding for Drug Free Commmunites program

Rubio

FSGG

ONDCP-HIDTA

Increased funding for HIDTA program

Rubio

Interior

NPS

Report language included to help strengthen the coordination between federal and state management of marine fisheries management and ecosystem protection in Biscayne National Park. 

Rubio

Interior

NPS

Restored cuts proposed by the Administration for Everglades and $10.032M included for Everglades.

Rubio

Interior

USFWS

Invasive species funding within the FWS is at the enacted level or higher throughout the bill.  Within the National Wildlife Refuge account, there is specific report language calling out the Service's work on invasive species efforts in the Everglades.

Rubio

Interior

USGS

Funding for invasive species is continued at the enacted level with report language for Everglades work to continue.

Rubio

Interior

USFWS

Report language related to the Fish and Wildlife Service's current CITES permitting process is included with the goal to identify bottlenecks within the current system causing delays in permit approval. 

Rubio

Interior

EPA

The South Florida program is funded at the FY 17 level and there is specific report language relating to the program.

Rubio

Interior

USFWS

State and Tribal Wildlife Grants are funded at $63.6 million, a $1 million increase from FY 17.

Rubio

Interior

Smithsonian  Institute

Report language on the Latino museum is included.

Rubio

Interior

LWCF

LWCF programs receive $425M, a $25M increase and includes 4 FL projects.

Rubio

LHHS

DOL

$86.1 million for Bureau of International Labor Affairs

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/HRSA

+$135 million for opioid response within community health centers

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/HRSA

Continues funding at $2.319 billion for Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/HRSA

Includes $20.8 million for Poison Control Centers (+$2 million)

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/HRSA

Includes $651.7 million for the Maternal & Child Health Block Grant (+$10 million)

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/Opioids

Provides $3.6 billion for opioid response, an increase of $2.55 billion. Increases are as follows: $415 million for HRSA, $350 million for CDC, $500 million for NIH, $100 million for ACF, $1.2 billion for SAMHSA, of which $1,000 billion is for state block grants which includes a 15 percent set-aside for hardest hit states, $50 million for Tribes, and $4 million State floor.

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/CDC

$615 million (+$30 million) for Emerging Zoonic and Infectious Diseases

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/CDC

$670 million (+$10 million) for Public Health Emergency Preparedness

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/CDC

An increase of $350 million for Prescriptions Drug Overdose activities

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/CDC

$141 million (+$3 million) for National Center on Birth Defects

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/CDC

$49 million (+$5 million) for Rape Prevention

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/CMS

DME Interim Final Rule SOM language

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/OS

Includes Zika report language in the Senate bill

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/OS

Includes Risk Corridor bill language

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/PHSSEF

An increase of $7.5 million for National Disaster Medical Reserve Corps

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/PHSSEF

$25 million increase for BARDA

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/PHSSEF

$200 million for Project BioShield

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/NIH

$3 billion increase for National Institutes of Health

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/NIH

$140 million increase for BRAIN Initiative

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/NIH

$292.8 million increase for National Cancer Institute

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/NIH

$414 million increase for Alzheimer's Research

Rubio

LHHS

ED

$299 million increase for IDEA Grants to States

Rubio

LHHS

ED

$58 million increase for Charter Schools Programs

Rubio

LHHS

ED

$7 million increase for Magnet Schools Program

Rubio

LHHS

ED

$2.5 million increase for Special Olympics

Rubio

LHHS

ED

$10 million for the new Statewide Family Engagement Centers program

Rubio

LHHS

ED

$82 million increase for Aid for Institutional Development programs

Rubio

LHHS

ED

$75 million increase for CTE State Grants

Rubio

LHHS

ED

$107 million increase for Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants

Rubio

LHHS

ED

$26 million increase for AmeriCorps State and National grants

Rubio

LHHS

HHS/ED

$47 million increas for school safety evidence-based competitive grant programs at Education and HHS, and $700 million increase in Student Support and Academic Enrichment formula grants to school districts that can be used for school counselors, school-based mental health and related activities.

Rubio

LHHS

 

$47 million increase for school safety

Rubio

Leg Branch

Sergeant at Arms

Increases funding for cybersecurity efforts in the Senate

Rubio

Leg Branch

Senate

Report language for Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control

Rubio

MilCon-VA

DoD

includes full funding for Florida MILCON request at Eglin AFB, Mayport, MacDill AFB, Hurlburt Field and Patrick AFB

Rubio

MilCon-VA

DoD

includes an additional two Florida projects from the UFR list authorized in the NDAA at Eglin AFB and Tyndall

Rubio

MilCon-VA

DoD

includes report language regarding strategic disperal of east coast homported capital ships, as you requested

Rubio

MilCon-VA

DoD

includes report language regarding test and training range instrumentation modernization, as you requested

Rubio

MilCon-VA

VA

Camp Lejeune water claims report language

Rubio

MilCon-VA

VA

PTSD treatment at universities report language

Rubio

MilCon-VA

VA

reforms to expediate the appeals process report language

Rubio

MilCon-VA

VA

oversight of substance inspection programs for opioid treatment report language

Rubio

SFOPS

State

Prohibits funding to implement the UN Arms Trade Treaty. (Section 7062)

Rubio

SFOPS

State

Provides $275 million for the GAVI Alliance.

Rubio

SFOPS

State

Maintains current funding levels for HIV/AIDS programs, including bilateral PEPFAR programs and the Global Fund.

Rubio

SFOPS

State

Includes $20 m for democracy programs in Cuba.

Rubio

SFOPS

State

Includes $15 m for democracy promotion in Venezuela.

Rubio

SFOPS

State

Provides not less than $3.1 billion for assistance for Israel, which is equal to the current MOU level.

Rubio

SFOPS

State

Provides $55.5 m for internet freedom programs, including for firewall circumvention technologies.

Rubio

SFOPS

State

Includes reporting requirement on human rights in Hong Kong.

Rubio

SFOPS

State

Maintains the “Helms Amendment,” banning the use of foreign aid funding for abortions; ensures that family planning programs funded through this bill are voluntary; and prohibits funding of organizations the President determines to support coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization.

Rubio

SFOPS

State

Includes $25m for programs to combat modern slavery.

Rubio

SFOPS

State

Includes a total of $78.8 m for programs to combat trafficking in persons. 

Rubio

SFOPS

State

$170m for the National Endowment for Democracy, equal to the FY 2017 level.

Rubio

SFOPS

State

$2m for the Congressional-Executive Commission on China

Rubio

SFOPS

State

$44.2 m for Radio Free Asia.

Rubio

SFOPS

State

The bill continues current law restrictions on assistance for the West Bank and Gaza, as well as restrictions on assistance for the Palestinian Authority.

Rubio

SFOPS

State

$615 m to support the US Strategy for Engagement in Central America.

Rubio

SFOPS

State

$17m to support Tibetan communities.

Rubio

THUD

DOT

TIGER funded at $1.5 billion ($500 million was requested)

Rubio

THUD

FTA

Supports funding CIG consistent with authorized levels ($2.645 billion is provided)

Rubio

THUD

FHWA

Supports fully funding FHWA at authorized levels ($47.498 billion provided)

Rubio

THUD

FRA

Includes report language on DOT adopting a standardized Bench Test Equipment (BTE)

Rubio

THUD

FAA

Fully funds contract towers at $165 million

Rubio

THUD

FAA

Supports fully funding the Airport Improvement Grants at $3.35 billion ($4.35 billion provided)

Rubio

THUD

FAA

Supports fully funding AST – funded at $28.959 million - $22.587 million for Ops; $4.5 million for F&E; and $1.872 million for R,E&D (Requested $29.587 broken down as  $21.587 million – Ops, $4.5 million – F&E, and $3.5 million – R,E,&D) 

Rubio

THUD

MARAD

Supports funding the Small Shipyards Grant Program at $30 million ($20 million provided)

Rubio

THUD

HUD

Includes language provisions strengthening inspections and improving the physical quality of HUD-assisted properties

Rubio

THUD

HUD

AFFH – Included modified language that prohibits funds being used for AFFH if HUD is dictating local zoning

Rubio

THUD

HUD

Report language included on best practices for producing new housing in high cost metropolitan areas

Rubio

THUD

HUD

HOPWA funded at $375 million

Additionally:

$6 million for CDC tracking of Muscular Dystrophy

$38.6 million for CDC vector-borne diseases

$23 million for CDC tracking of Autism 

Department of Agriculture
  • $2.36 billion for crop disasters as a result of hurricanes and wildfires in 2017 to remain available through 2019
  • $22 million to repair damages to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) facilities, including four in Florida: Canal Point, Miami, Fort Pierce, and Ft. Lauderdale
  • $165.475 million to repair drinking water systems and sewer and solid waste disposal systems affected by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria in small rural communities
  • $24 million to provide an additional 35 million pounds of food for food banks in states affected by hurricanes and wildfires
  • $14 million for the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) to help repair and replace equipment in WIC clinics in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands
  • $7.5 million for State and Private Forestry. The Forest Service will use these funds to support damage assessments, technical assistance, and invasive species assessment and mitigation work on State and private lands
Army Corps of Engineers
  • $15.055 billion for project construction, including expedited completion of Herbert Hoover Dike at full federal cost, and complete restoration of hurricane-impacted federal beach renourishment projects in Florida
  • $135 million for project investigations, including Senator Rubio’s South Atlantic Coast Comprehensive Study at full federal cost
  • $608 million for project Operations & Maintenance, including repairs to Everglades restoration project infrastructure
  • $810 million for Flood Control and Coastal Emergencies needs, including in Florida, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands
  • Includes general reporting provisions that requires the Corps of Engineers to provide monthly damage estimates and progress assessments to Congress
Department of Energy
  • $13 million for activities related to the consequences of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria, including technical assistance related to electric grids
U.S. Coast Guard
  • $112.1 million to provide for the costs of Coast Guard personnel responding to Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria
  • $718.9 million to repair and strengthen facilities and assets damaged by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, Maria, and Matthew
Department of the Interior
  • $207.6 million for National Park Service Construction to rebuild and repair facilities and other critical agency infrastructure, including for new facilities at Everglades National Park
Environmental Protection Agency
  • $6.2 million for the Superfund program to help repair damage sustained to remedies at Superfund sites, including removal of damaged tanks and containers and repair of groundwater monitoring wells, aeration towers, and fencing
  • Provides Puerto Rico access to previously appropriated State Revolving Fund money to help rebuild the island’s clean water and drinking water systems
Department of Commerce
  • $18 million for marine debris removal - important for Florida’s waterways and coastal waters, which are still plagued by safety hazards
  • $600 million for the Economic Development Administration to provide grants to communities directly impacted by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria, as well as other disasters declared in 2017. This funding will support immediate relief efforts and long-term recovery projects, including repairing and replacing basic infrastructure needs that are vital for local economic recovery
  • $200 million for Fisheries Data Assistance (Note: Florida’s fisheries disaster request for Hurricane Irma is still pending with the Department of Commerce)
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
  • $81 million to repair facilities damaged at NASA’s Kennedy and Johnson Space Centers
Department of Homeland Security – $24.7 billion
  • Funding for the Disaster Relief Fund to support response and recovery efforts to support Florida and Puerto Rico
  • Funding to address damages to CBP facilities resulting from Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria
  • Funding to repair and restore the San Juan Customs House, improve its functionality, and terminate costly temporary leases
  • Funding to repair ICE facilities in Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Texas, and Florida that sustained water damage
Department of Housing and Urban Development – $28 billion
  • Funding for Community Development Block Grant Disaster Relief (CDBG-DR), at least $11 billion of which will go directly to Puerto Rico and USVI
  • Disaster Assistance Simplification Act, which will help victims of the natural disaster avoid being penalized for weighing all disaster assistance
Department of Transportation – $1.828 billion
  • Funding to replace Federal Aviation Administration’s equipment
  • Funding for Federal Highway Administration’s Emergency Relief program
Department of Education –  $2.7 billion
  • Funding for building and facility repairs and accommodating enrollment of displaced students
  • Funding for Higher Education Institutions that have taken in students from hurricane affected areas, such as Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands
  • Funding to assist students that became homeless because of the hurricanes
Department of Health and Human Services
  • Medicaid for Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI): $4.9 billion
  • For both Puerto Rico and USVI, there is a temporary 100% Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP)
  • Funding necessary for Florida’s hospitals to repair damage from the storm
  • Includes language modeled after Senator Rubio’s legislation to ensure that HHS has the necessary medical personnel needed to respond natural disasters
Department of Veterans Affairs - $93.5 million 
  • Includes funding to cover increased costs to maintain medical services and funding to repair damaged medical facilities in Florida and Puerto Rico
  • Includes funding to repair damages to the Puerto Rico National Cemetery
Department of Labor – $130.9 million
  • Funding necessary to rehabilitate and repair Job Corps Centers in Puerto Rico
  • Funding for disaster response economic recovery through the Dislocated Worker National Reserve
Small Business Administration – $1.65 billion
  • Funding for Small Business Disaster Loan Programs
Legal Services Corporation – $15 million
  • Funding to provide storm-related services to LSC client populations affected by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria, as well as wildfires in 2017
Department of Defense (DOD) – $1.55 billion

“Last night I terminated the employment of my Chief of Staff after personally receiving a complaint about his conduct, and thereafter coming into possession of clear and irrefutable evidence of workplace misconduct and harassment. It was the express wish of those injured in this matter to remain anonymous and to not have any details publicly released which could result in their identities being revealed. I have honored these requests to the best of my ability.  If at any time in the future they decide to come forward publicly they will have my full support, cooperation and assistance.  

“The overwhelming majority of media outlets have responsibly respected our decision to honor this request. They understand that it would be morally wrong to cause further injury to those victimized in this matter by ignoring their wishes. Sadly, at least one media outlet, the Miami Herald, does not share this view. 

“On Sunday, they published an article which calls into question the validity of what they erroneously describe as a ‘hasty’ investigation, and cynically imply that by honoring the specific request of the victims we are withholding information they are entitled to. It appears their desire to obtain as many salacious details as possible in order to publish a story that generates traffic for their website has blinded them to the fact that reporting harassment is a very difficult decision for many victims. This is especially true for those employed in government, who too often prefer to not come forward in order to avoid having their stories reported in the press and becoming a permanent result of any internet searches about them.  

“No matter how many articles of this kind they choose to publish, they will never pressure me to violate the trust the victims have placed in me. Not only is this the right thing to do in this particular case, if victims of harassment come to believe that they cannot report harassment without having their identities revealed, it may discourage those who do not want to be publicly identified from reporting cases of harassment in the future.”   

Happy Thanksgiving

Nov 23 2017

Thanksgiving is an opportunity to appreciate, with our families and friends, the unlimited opportunities and promise America has to offer. This land is the greatest nation mankind has ever known, in part because it was founded to protect the inalienable rights bestowed on us by our Creator, allowing us to thrive in freedom and prosperity.
 
As you enjoy turkey, mashed potatoes, pumpkin pie, and football, I encourage you to take some time to show gratitude to those around you – for the foundation of a strong and prosperous America always start with the family.
 
Finally, let us remember that our freedom could not be possible without the valor and sacrifice of our servicemen and women at home and abroad. Many of them will not be able to join their families this Thanksgiving. But while they may be far away today, they are still close in our hearts.

May God bless you. May God bless all those who protect us. May God bless Florida. And may God always bless the United States of America.
 
From my family to yours, Happy Thanksgiving.
 


 

Mientras Puerto Rico se recupera después del Huracán Maria, mi oficina está dispuesta a ayudar a todos en Puerto Rico. Para solicitar asistencia directa, envie un correo electrónico a PR@rubio.senate.gov.

Click here for English

Para ayuda con los alimentos o agua potable, refugio, o suministros medicos contacte las siguientes agencias:
 
1.   La Cruz Roja Americana
Si usted ha sido afectado por un desastre, puede usar la página de la Cruz Roja Americana para escribir "mensajes de sano y salvo” que sus seres queridos puedan llegar a ver. El registro en el sitio web Sano y Salvo es completamente voluntario y usted puede ingresar y actualizarlo en todo momento. Las búsquedas de información en el sitio web necesitarán siempre que usted ingrese solo su nombre y dirección o teléfono. El resultado de la búsqueda solo mostrará su nombre, apellido, la fecha y hora de registro y un pequeño mensaje contando su historia. Para registrarse como Sano y Salvo usted se compromete a hacer uso de la información como esta escrito en esta página.   

  • Para encontrar búsquedas, haga clic aquí.
  • También puede registrarse como Sano y Salvo escriba la palabra “SAFE” en un mensaje de texto al número 78876.
  • Para hablar con un empleado de la Cruz Roja Americana sobre una persona desaparecida que tiene un problema de salud muy serio, llame al (1-800-733-2767).

2.      El registro de Menores no Acompañados

Si encuentra un menor separado de sus padres o guardianes legales, por favor llame a su agencia local de policía inmediato. Luego completa el siguiente. El Registro de Menores no Acompañados es compatible con el Centro Nacional de Niños Desaparecidos (NCMEC) por los que el público puede reportar la información relacionada con los niños que han sido separados de sus padres o guardianes legales como consecuencia de un desastre. Esta herramienta permitirá que el NCMEC pueda prestar asistencia a las autoridades locales y asistir en la reunificación de los niños desplazados con su círculo familiar o tutores legales. Si le resulta problematico reportar en linea (por internet), por favor, llame al telefono de NCMEC 1-800-THE LOST, (1-800-843-5678). Atienden las 24 horas del dia. Un menor no acompañado es un niño que ha sido separado de sus padres, tutores legales, y otros parientes y no están siendo atendidos por un adulto que, por ley o costumbre, es responsable de hacerlo.

3.     FEMA
Aunque muchos estadounidenses están trabajando arduamente para ayudar a sus vecinos en estos momentos catastróficos, hay algunos que siempre tratarán de aprovecharse de los más vulnerables. Para disipar algunos de los rumores falsos que circulan por internet y las redes sociales, FEMA atiende algunos de los temas más communes en esta página web.

 Información de FEMA sobre el Huracán Maria está disponible aquí:

Información addicional para Puerto Rico está disponible aquí:

Los sobrevivientes pueden recoger alimentos y agua en el ayuntamiento de las siguientes ciudades:
 
Puerto Rico

  • Aguadilla
  • Aibonito
  • Arecibo
  • Bayamón
  • Camuy
  • Canovanas
  • Ciales
  • Culebra
  • Mayaguez
  • Ponce
  • Rincon
  • Rio Grande
  • Santa Isabel
  • Utuado
  • Vega Alta
  • Vieques
Para ver los avisos importantes sobre la recuperación de Puerto Rico: Haga clic aqui: http://status.pr/