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ICYMI: Rubio Joins Hannity

U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) joined Hannity to discuss his confrontation with election-denier hypocrisy in the legacy media and the latest on the Trump trial. Watch the full interview on YouTube and...

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Rubio Habla con Ninoska Pérez en La Poderosa

“El pueblo cubano sigue siendo un pueblo valiente” El senador estadounidense Marco Rubio (R-FL) habló con Ninoska Pérez en La Poderosa 670 AM, sobre cómo el anhelo de una Cuba libre sigue más vivo que nunca, especialmente hoy el 20 de mayo, en el Día de la...

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Rubio, Rosen: ICC’s Overreach is Outrageous

Earlier this month, U.S. Senators Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Jacky Rosen (D-NV) led a bipartisan letter to President Joe Biden urging him to strongly oppose the International Criminal Court’s (ICC) efforts to politically target Israel and respond swiftly and strongly...

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Fact Checking Today’s Immigration News Reports

Apr 16, 2013 | Blog

MYTH: “180 days after Obama signs bill, Department of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano submits two border security plans to Congress. No further action is required.” (Conn Carroll, “The Gang of Ocho’s Path to Citizenship in 7 Easy Steps,” Washington Examiner, 4/16/13)

FACT: Not only is a plan submitted, the plan has to be funded by Congress and implementation of the plan has to begin.

MYTH: “Prove they have been in the U.S. since December 2011.” (Conn Carroll, “The Gang of Ocho’s Path to Citizenship in 7 Easy Steps,” Washington Examiner, 4/16/13)

FACT: Prove you have been in the U.S. since before December 2011.

MYTH: “Ten years after obtaining RPI status, immigrants may apply for ‘Lawful Permanent Resident’ status.” (Conn Carroll, “The Gang of Ocho’s Path to Citizenship in 7 Easy Steps,” Washington Examiner, 4/16/13)

FACT: Ten years after obtaining RPI status, immigrants may apply for ‘Lawful Permanent Resident’ status provided the security triggers have been met.”

MYTH: “To qualify for permanent resident status, immigrants must: A) Pay a $1,000 fine. B) Prove they have paid all taxes since obtaining RPI status. C) Demonstrate knowledge of civics and English.” (Conn Carroll, “The Gang of Ocho’s Path to Citizenship in 7 Easy Steps,” Washington Examiner, 4/16/13)

FACT: To qualify for permanent resident status, immigrants must: A) Pay a $1,000 fine, in addition to the $1,000 they’ve already paid. B) Prove they have paid all taxes that they owe. C) Demonstrate knowledge of civics and English. D) prove gainful employment and that they will not be public charges.

MYTH: “As lawful permanent residents, former undocumented immigrants are free to apply for citizenship along with all other green card holders.” (Conn Carroll, “The Gang of Ocho’s Path to Citizenship in 7 Easy Steps,” Washington Examiner, 4/16/13)

FACT: As lawful permanent residents, former undocumented immigrants are free to apply for citizenship along with all other green card holders after three years of being awarded a green card.

MYTH: “The Senate bill would allow most undocumented immigrants who arrived in the country before Dec. 31, 2011, to immediately gain ‘registered provisional’ status after paying a $500 fine and back taxes, provided they have not committed a felony or three misdemeanors.” (David Nakamura, “Senators To Release Plan, Including A Path To Citizenship,” WaPo, 4/16/13)

“Only undocumented immigrants who arrived in the country before Dec. 31, 2011, are eligible for a provisional legal status. They also would need to pay a $500 fine per adult and all assessed taxes.” (Manu Raju and Carrie Budoff Brown and Anna Palmer, “Immigration Ready for Debut,” Politico, 4/15/13)

“The measure would allow most undocumented immigrants who arrived in the country before Dec. 31, 2011, to immediately gain ‘registered provisional’ status after paying a $500 fine and back taxes, provided they have not committed a felony or three misdemeanors.” (David Nakamura, Aaron C. Davis and Sean Sullivan, “Immigration bill path to citizenship too stringent, advocacy groups say,” WaPo, 4/16/13)

FACT: The total fine will be $2,000 per illegal immigrant, and the first payment on the fine will be $500. Even after the fine is paid, no one “immediately gains” temporary status until these criteria are met and the first security trigger happens with the implementation of the border security plan.

MYTH: “[Illegal immigrants] could then apply for permanent resident status in 10 years after paying additional fees. Three years later, they could apply for citizenship, according to the plan summary. The fastest path to full citizenship would take 13 years, according to the legislation, but it could take longer in some cases, Senate staffers said.” (David Nakamura, “Senators To Release Plan, Including A Path To Citizenship,” WaPo, 4/16/13)

“The bill creates what is certain to be a controversial pathway to citizenship for the nation’s 11 million undocumented immigrants to become permanent legal residents a decade after they register with the government. Immigrants would pay a $2,000 fine, pass a background check, have a job and wait 10 years before applying for a green card. Three years after that, they could apply to become U.S. citizens.” (Manu Raju and Carrie Budoff Brown and Anna Palmer, “Immigration Ready for Debut,” Politico, 4/15/13)

“They could then apply for permanent resident status in 10 years after paying additional fees. Three years later, they could apply for citizenship, according to the plan summary. The fastest path to full citizenship would take 13 years, according to the legislation, but it could take longer in some cases, Senate staffers said. The bill will also require the government to implement strict new border-control measures — including up to $7 billion in new surveillance drones, fencing, border guards and workplace tracking systems — before the undocumented immigrants are granted green cards. The bill stipulates that the government must surveil 100 percent of the border and apprehend 90 percent of the people trying to enter illegally in high-risk sectors.” (David Nakamura, Aaron C. Davis and Sean Sullivan, “Immigration bill path to citizenship too stringent, advocacy groups say,” WaPo, 4/16/13)

FACT: The chance to become a permanent resident, which precedes citizenship, is based on achieving the security triggers and waiting at least ten years. It is not based exclusively on a date-certain timeline.